Relocation / Migration Support

Migration Support

Migration support services assist our clients with their VISA requests for going to overseas. Our experts will take care of your getting VISA & other credentials and keep you regularly informed about your application’s progress.

We work for getting your VISA following certain rules and regulations in accordance with the country’s requirements. Each country has multiple of categories of VISAs with various names. The most common types and names of VISAs are mentioned here.

Transit VISA

For passing through the country of issue to a destination outside that country. Validity of transit visas are usually limited by short terms such as several hours to ten days depending on the size of the country or the circumstances of a particular transit itinerary.

Short-stay or visitor VISA

For short visits to the visited country. Many countries differentiate between different reasons for these visits, such as:

  1. Private visa, for private visits by invitation from residents of the visited country.

  2. Tourist visa, for a limited period of leisure travel, no business activities allowed.

  3. Visa for medical reasons, for undertaking diagnostics or a course of treatment in the visited country's hospitals or other medical facilities.

  4. Business visa, for engaging in commerce in the country. These visas generally preclude permanent employment, for which a work visa would be required.

  5. Working holiday visa, for individuals travelling between nations offering a working holiday program, allowing young people to undertake temporary work while travelling.

Long-stay VISA

Visas valid for long term stays of a specific duration include:

  1. Student visa (F-1 in the United States), which allows its holder to study at an institution of higher learning in the issuing country. The F-2 visa allows the student's dependents to accompany them in the United States.


  2. Research visa, for students doing fieldwork in the host country.


  3. Temporary worker visa, for approved employment in the host country. These are generally more difficult to obtain but valid for longer periods of time than a business visa. Examples of these are the United States' H-1B and L-1 visas. Depending on a particular country, the status of temporary worker may or may not evolve into the status of permanent resident or to naturalization.


  4. Journalist visa, which some countries require of people in that occupation when travelling for their respective news organizations. Countries that insist on this include Cuba, China, Iran, Japan, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, the United States (I-visa) and Zimbabwe.


  5. Residence visa, granted to people obtaining long-term residence in the host country. In some countries, such as New Zealand, long-term residence is a necessary step to obtain the status of a permanent resident.

Immigrant visas

Granted for those intending to settle permanently in the issuing country (obtain the status of a permanent resident with a prospect of possible naturalization in the future):

  1. Spouse visa or partner visa, granted to the spouse, civil partner or de facto partner of a resident or citizen of a given country to enable the couple to settle in that country.


  2. Marriage visa, granted for a limited period before intended marriage or civil partnership based on a proven relationship with a citizen of the destination country. For example, a German woman wishing to marry an American man would obtain a Fiancée Visa (also known as a K-1 visa) to allow her to enter the United States. A K1 Fiancée Visa is valid for four months from the date of its approval.


  3. Pensioner visa (also known as retiree visa or retirement visa), issued by a limited number of countries (Australia, Argentina, Thailand, Panama, etc.), to those who can demonstrate a foreign source of income and who do not intend to work in the issuing country. Age limits apply in some cases.